Upcoming Events, And a New Texas Field Notes

One way to help protect nature is by sharing what it is like to walk through Texas’ woodlands, prairies, wetlands, deserts, and mountains and teach people a little of the natural history of these places. Sometimes we try to do this through writing, and sometimes in more direct ways. Clint and I are participating in a couple of upcoming events we would like to tell you about.

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A Pond at Southwest Nature Preserve

On April 28, Nic Martinez (an expert on fish and aquatic ecosystems) will join us for a free event at the Southwest Nature Preserve. We plan three activities, starting at 4:00pm with exploring what’s below the ponds using nets and seines (this is an approved SW Nature Preserve activity – please don’t do this on your own). A variety of turtles, frogs, fish, and invertebrates live in the ponds, and we’ll find some of them and document them in the citizen science app “iNaturalist,” as part of the City Nature Challenge 2018. Next, at 6:00pm the two of us and Nic will lead a walk through the preserve, exploring this Eastern Cross Timbers ecosystem and the critters that live there. Then, at 8:00pm as night falls we will take another walk. We will pay particular attention to the edges of the ponds, where frogs may be calling and we might see a harmless snake or two swimming under a nearly full moon! Owls may be calling and spiders will be spinning their beautiful webs.

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LBJ National Grasslands

On May 26, the two of us will lead some hikes at the LBJ National Grasslands in Wise County. This is a place where both of us have spent a lot of time, and it offers a great deal to those who love the prairies and woods of the Cross Timbers. The event is sponsored by the Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge, and is offered for members of the Friends of Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge. We are particularly focusing on the reptiles and amphibians of the LBJ National Grasslands, but you know that Clint will be showing us a lot about the invertebrates that we will find. Michael Perez, from the nature center, can contribute tons of expertise regarding birds and lots more. The event is available for a limited number of people on a first-come, first-served basis, and only to members of the Friends of FWNCR. The Friends would be very happy for you to become a member!

TX-Field-Notes-Jul12Among our past efforts to share nature and encourage conservation was the publication of Texas Field Notes (TFN). The first issue of TFN appeared in 2003 and a few others followed, but it was in April, 2010 that Clint joined Michael in writing an issue of TFN, beginning a long and productive partnership. Our goal was to share our travels across the state looking for herps and get readers “hooked” on the experience of being out there in those wonderful places and seeing amazing wildlife. Perhaps through our words and photos, readers would come to feel a connection to those places that was like home – a place where they felt at peace, where they belonged, and a place they would want to protect. Perhaps readers would have an even greater understanding that everything in the woods, prairies, wetlands, and deserts had an important role to play, even if it was not obvious to us. Even the lowly and misunderstood have value and would be missed if they were gone. Our goal has been this – get out there, experience all you can, and treasure the natural world like a beloved member of your family.

Now seems like a good time to revive that publication, as a companion to this blog. There is something to be said for a publication that you can print and hold in your hands, and one that can be downloaded and saved (or read at the Issuu website). We hope that readers will share it with others, and that schools might make use of it. We also want to include other voices, so if you are a naturalist with something you would like to write, please get in touch with us. We strive to make TFN engaging and accessible for readers, while making sure that its scientific accuracy is solid. And as it was before, it will be a free publication.

On top of all that, we are working on the page proofs for the forthcoming book, Herping Texas: The Quest for Reptiles and Amphibians, due out this fall. We are really excited about finally seeing this book come out, and hope you will be, too.

Mary’s Creek, Across the Generations

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The creek, 3/31/2018

It was a beautiful warm day, the last day of March, and perfect for introducing a couple of people to my favorite prairie creek in western Tarrant County. Flowing across the dark earth of the Fort Worth prairie, the water cuts down to the layers of limestone, clay, and shale, so that the creek bed is relatively wide and flat. I was introduced to Mary’s Creek in the 1960’s by museum buddies, and we walked and waded along its course finding plenty of the reptiles and amphibians that we loved. On this day, Clint and his nine-year-old son Zev would make its acquaintance, wading through clear water and walking over jumbled limestone rocks that the creek piles up like coarse sandbars. Zev is just a little younger than I was when I first explored this place.

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Plain-bellied or “blotched” watersnake – a harmless snake seen in 2009 at the creek

In the early days, it was almost a sure thing that you would find a ribbonsnake or two threading their way through the vegetation at the water’s edge, hunting for cricket frogs. Similarly, plain-bellied watersnakes (then called blotched watersnakes) were common, though the creek has gone through periods when diamond-backed watersnakes dominated. When I first wandered this creek, it was common to see Texas earless lizards darting between chunks of limestone and stopping to raise their tail and wave the exposed black-and-white bars underneath in a display meant to distract predators. These pale gray or slightly beige lizards are still found here and there in central and west Texas, but they are evidently gone from Tarrant County, at least.

A lizard that may still put in an appearance from time to time, especially in areas where sandy soil borders the creek bed, is the Texas spotted whiptail. These striped lizards burrow in sandy soil and easily live up to the speed implied by “whiptail” and “racerunner” (a closely related species). Red-eared slider turtles have always been there, and occasionally you find a Texas river cooter. Spiny soft-shelled turtles turn up here and there, as do snapping turtles.

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Texas river cooter seen at Mary’s Creek in 2015

When we started our walk, Clint went ahead in search of insects, while Zev and I spent quite a bit of time wading through broad, shallow pools and narrow places where the water surged along rapidly. We talked about how the exposed flat areas of limestone are quite slippery because of the algae growing there, and he quickly learned to use submerged patches of gravel for more sure footing. His curiosity is unquenchable, and he brought up a pebble of shale and marveled at the gooey surface of the rock. These “mudstones” are really just compressed silt and clay, and they easily deteriorate after being in the water. We probably both would have enjoyed wading on into the deeper areas and dunking below the water, had we been dressed for it. But we tried to stay upright in our trek across the slippery limestone and somehow we both succeeded.

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A section of ammonite from Mary’s Creek

It became largely a fossil-finding walk for Zev, as we looked for fragments of the late-Cretaceous ammonites that are fairly common in the limestone bed of the creek. “Lower” Cretaceous means late in that geologic period when dinosaurs were alive and a shallow sea covered a good portion of Texas. A little over 100 million years ago, the area around Fort Worth was at or near the shores of that sea, and to the southwest the dinosaur tracks around Glen Rose were evidently made in the mud around the water’s edge. The limestone of western Tarrant County contains fossils of many sea creatures, including oysters, gastropods whose shells made a spiral cone, rounded sea urchins, and ammonites. While the overall shape of an ammonite shell suggests that of a chambered nautilus, they are said to have been more closely related to today’s squids and cuttlefish. In my many walks and wades along this creek, I used to find intact ammonites up to about 18 inches across (which is not their maximum size). Whether because the creek has eroded down to layers with fewer fossils or for some other reason, a walk today will usually turn up no more than a segment of that ribbed spiral shell.

We each spotted several segments of ammonites, and I found an oyster or two while Clint picked up a couple of gastropods for Zev’s inspection. I think Zev is ready to return to the creek, and I would sure be happy if I have handed down a tradition that he can pick up and carry on. These prairie streams are magical, whether they are running with clear water after rains or drying in the summer sun into isolated pools where sunfish dart under submerged ledges and herons prowl the water’s edge for frogs and fish.

Spearing, D. 1991. Roadside geology of Texas. Missoula: Mountain Press Publishing Co.

Wikipedia: Ammonoidea. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammonoidea (accessed 4/1/18)